Teflon – Years A Pain

by Mar 15, 2021Artist, Reviews

Teflon - Years A Pain
Teflon

Release Info

Teflon – Years A Pain

Label:  Yard A Love Records | Format: DR | Street date: March 12, 2021 | Facebook artist

Tracks

  1. Hardest Hill To Climb
  2. Warriors
  3. Pagon
  4. Vacancy
  5. Need Somebody
  6. Solid To The End
  7. In A Store
  8. Stop Hype
  9. Think Before You Talk feat. I-Wayne
  10. Years A Pain
  11. Come To Pass
  12. Famo Alone
  13. Emotions
  14. Sick A Mi
  15. Revolution
  16. From Mi Heart
  17. Love Your Life (Clean)
  18. Love Your Life (Explicit)
  19. Brimstone
  20. Rise Up
  21. Stand Up & Do This Alone feat. Turbulence
Teflon

Born and raised in the parish of St Mary, widely recognised as one of few parishes to have produced topnotch Jamaican artists such as Ninja Man, Lady Saw and Capleton, Shaniel Andre Watson aka Teflon recorded his debut single Bless Me Jah in 2003 for a small record label based in Ocho Rios. Shortly after he recorded Holding On To Jah Jah Love, a song that would have producers searching for the new young artist. Under the guidance of Wayne Morris from Irie Fm, Teflon started recording for some well-known producers in reggae music including Donovan Bennett, Cordel Burrell, and Michael Brissett to name a few.

Debut Album

In 2007, he scored his first local number one hit with a song called Gun Rise on the Bullet Proof Vest riddim. Two years later Teflon’s full-length debut album Motherless Child was released on the Tad’s International label. In the same year, he released another album entitled Let Jah Be Praised and enjoyed steady rotation with radio hits such as Jailhouse Rock and All The Days Of My Life (Jah Has Been There), both produced by Stephen ‘Di Genius’ McGregor. Being support act for Sizzla during his ‘Ghetto Youthogoly Tour’ brought him to Europe for eight weeks and made his fan base grow. And then, in the last month of the year 2015, there was the release of Teflon’s album Young King – subtitled The Beginning – on his own Yard A Love Records label (distributed by Tuff Gong International). In 2018, Teflon released an EP called So Determine featuring production work from Yard A Love Records, DJ Wayne, and ZJ Ice. The following year, he also released a mixtape titled Acknowledge Me Or Don’t, which featured hip-hop-influenced tracks.

Young King

Teflon, also known as the Young King, has now released his anticipated brand new full-length album entitled Years A Pain, which consists of a whopping twenty-one tracks including two collaborations with I-Wayne and Turbulence respectively. When an album features so many songs it’s always the question if that ain’t too much in terms of consistency and quality. And although this set indeed includes a few mediocre efforts, it’s not a big deal in the end. Musically it are computerized modern dancehall riddims that dominate this collection of tunes, while lyrically the songs featured here deal with a variety of themes such as strength, upliftment, and consciousness.

Some Of The Very Best

The husky-toned-sounding singjay gets things started with the intoxicating conscious piece Hardest Hill To Climb which is definitely not to be missed. Although not in the same league as the opener, Vacancy is a quite great sounding piece. Teflon turns in an excellent performance on the incredible vibed In A Store, one of the album’s biggest tunes that comes across a riddim that sounds familiar to the ears. BOOOMMM! The previously released single Think Before You Talk which features I-Wayne, is a gorgeous piece although it may take a minute to grow. Also Emotions, another previously released single, is one of the best showings on the album. Revolution is underpinned by an odd-sounding riddim but Teflon rides it brilliantly throughout. It are efforts like this on which you can really tune into the artist lyrically. Without a doubt, the album’s most stellar effort is Brimstone, which definitely is one of the heavier vibed tracks on the album. To get the best listening experience you’ll have to turn the speakers way up!

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